From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Mathematics Master Information
Electives
For the Master's degree in Applied Mathematics the following additional condition (not manifest in myStudies) must be obeyed: At least 15 of the required 28 credits from core courses and electives must be acquired in areas of applied mathematics and further application-oriented fields.
Electives: Applied Mathematics and Further Application-Oriented Fields
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Selection: Probability Theory, Statistics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0649-00LApplied Statistical RegressionW5 credits2V + 1UM. Dettling
AbstractThis course offers a practically oriented introduction into regression modeling methods. The basic concepts and some mathematical background are included, with the emphasis lying in learning "good practice" that can be applied in every student's own projects and daily work life. A special focus will be laid in the use of the statistical software package R for regression analysis.
ObjectiveThe students acquire advanced practical skills in linear regression analysis and are also familiar with its extensions to generalized linear modeling.
ContentThe course starts with the basics of linear modeling, and then proceeds to parameter estimation, tests, confidence intervals, residual analysis, model choice, and prediction. More rarely touched but practically relevant topics that will be covered include variable transformations, multicollinearity problems and model interpretation, as well as general modeling strategies.

The last third of the course is dedicated to an introduction to generalized linear models: this includes the generalized additive model, logistic regression for binary response variables, binomial regression for grouped data and poisson regression for count data.
Lecture notesA script will be available.
LiteratureFaraway (2005): Linear Models with R
Faraway (2006): Extending the Linear Model with R
Draper & Smith (1998): Applied Regression Analysis
Fox (2008): Applied Regression Analysis and GLMs
Montgomery et al. (2006): Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis
Prerequisites / NoticeThe exercises, but also the classes will be based on procedures from the freely available, open-source statistical software package R, for which an introduction will be held.

In the Mathematics Bachelor and Master programmes, the two course units 401-0649-00L "Applied Statistical Regression" and 401-3622-00L "Statistical Modelling" are mutually exclusive. Registration for the examination of one of these two course units is only allowed if you have not registered for the examination of the other course unit.
401-3627-00LHigh-Dimensional StatisticsW4 credits2VP. L. Bühlmann
Abstract"High-Dimensional Statistics" deals with modern methods and theory for statistical inference when the number of unknown parameters is of much larger order than sample size. Statistical estimation and algorithms for complex models and aspects of multiple testing will be discussed.
ObjectiveKnowledge of methods and basic theory for high-dimensional statistical inference
ContentLasso and Group Lasso for high-dimensional linear and generalized linear models; Additive models and many smooth univariate functions; Non-convex loss functions and l1-regularization; Stability selection, multiple testing and construction of p-values; Undirected graphical modeling
LiteraturePeter Bühlmann and Sara van de Geer (2011). Statistics for High-Dimensional Data: Methods, Theory and Applications. Springer Verlag.
ISBN 978-3-642-20191-2.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of basic concepts in probability theory, and intermediate knowledge of statistics (e.g. a course in linear models or computational statistics).
401-4623-00LTime Series Analysis
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits3GN. Meinshausen
AbstractStatistical analysis and modeling of observations in temporal order, which exhibit dependence. Stationarity, trend estimation, seasonal decomposition, autocorrelations,
spectral and wavelet analysis, ARIMA-, GARCH- and state space models. Implementations in the software R.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the basic models and techniques used in time series analysis and their implementation in the statistical software R.
ContentThis course deals with modeling and analysis of variables which change randomly in time. Their essential feature is the dependence between successive observations.
Applications occur in geophysics, engineering, economics and finance. Topics covered: Stationarity, trend estimation, seasonal decomposition, autocorrelations,
spectral and wavelet analysis, ARIMA-, GARCH- and state space models. The models and techniques are illustrated using the statistical software R.
Lecture notesNot available
LiteratureA list of references will be distributed during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in probability and statistics
401-3612-00LStochastic Simulation
Does not take place this semester.
W5 credits3G
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to statistical Monte Carlo methods. This includes applications of simulations in various fields (Bayesian statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics), algorithms for the generation of random variables (accept-reject, importance sampling), estimating the precision, variance reduction, introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo.
ObjectiveStochastic simulation (also called Monte Carlo method) is the experimental analysis of a stochastic model by implementing it on a computer. Probabilities and expected values can be approximated by averaging simulated values, and the central limit theorem gives an estimate of the error of this approximation. The course shows examples of the many applications of stochastic simulation and explains different algorithms used for simulation. These algorithms are illustrated with the statistical software R.
ContentExamples of simulations in different fields (computer science, statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics). Generation of uniform random variables. Generation of random variables with arbitrary distributions (quantile transform, accept-reject, importance sampling), simulation of Gaussian processes and diffusions. The precision of simulations, methods for variance reduction. Introduction to Markov chains and Markov chain Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Hastings, Gibbs sampler, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, reversible jump MCMC).
Lecture notesA script will be available in English.
LiteratureP. Glasserman, Monte Carlo Methods in Financial Engineering.
Springer 2004.

B. D. Ripley. Stochastic Simulation. Wiley, 1987.

Ch. Robert, G. Casella. Monte Carlo Statistical Methods.
Springer 2004 (2nd edition).
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with basic concepts of probability theory (random variables, joint and conditional distributions, laws of large numbers and central limit theorem) will be assumed.
Selection: Financial and Insurance Mathematics
In the Master's programmes in Mathematics resp. Applied Mathematics 401-3913-01L Mathematical Foundations for Finance is eligible as an elective course, but only if 401-3888-00L Introduction to Mathematical Finance isn't recognised for credits (neither in the Bachelor's nor in the Master's programme). For the category assignment take contact with the Study Administration Office (www.math.ethz.ch/studiensekretariat) after having received the credits.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-3925-00LNon-Life Insurance: Mathematics and Statistics Information W8 credits4V + 1UM. V. Wüthrich
AbstractThe lecture aims at providing a basis in non-life insurance mathematics which forms a core subject of actuarial sciences. It discusses collective risk modeling, individual claim size modeling, approximations for compound distributions, ruin theory, premium calculation principles, tariffication with generalized linear models and neural networks, credibility theory, claims reserving and solvency.
ObjectiveThe student is familiar with the basics in non-life insurance mathematics and statistics. This includes the basic mathematical models for insurance liability modeling, pricing concepts, stochastic claims reserving models and ruin and solvency considerations.
ContentThe following topics are treated:
Collective Risk Modeling
Individual Claim Size Modeling
Approximations for Compound Distributions
Ruin Theory in Discrete Time
Premium Calculation Principles
Tariffication
Generalized Linear Models and Neural Networks
Bayesian Models and Credibility Theory
Claims Reserving
Solvency Considerations
Lecture notesM. V. Wüthrich, Non-Life Insurance: Mathematics & Statistics
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2319328
Prerequisites / NoticeThe exams ONLY take place during the official ETH examination period.

This course will be held in English and counts towards the diploma of "Aktuar SAV". For the latter, see details under www.actuaries.ch.

Prerequisites: knowledge of probability theory, statistics and applied stochastic processes.
401-3922-00LLife Insurance MathematicsW4 credits2VM. Koller
AbstractThe classical life insurance model is presented together with the important insurance types (insurance on one and two lives, term and endowment insurance and disability). Besides that the most important terms such as mathematical reserves are introduced and calculated. The profit and loss account and the balance sheet of a life insurance company is explained and illustrated.
Objective
401-3928-00LReinsurance AnalyticsW4 credits2VP. Antal, P. Arbenz
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to reinsurance from an actuarial perspective. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance and models for extreme events such as natural or man-made catastrophes. The lecture covers reinsurance contracts, Experience and Exposure pricing, natural catastrophe modelling, solvency regulation, and insurance linked securities
ObjectiveThis course provides an introduction to reinsurance from an actuarial perspective. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance and the mathematical approaches associated with low frequency high severity events such as natural or man-made catastrophes.
Topics covered include:
- Reinsurance Contracts and Markets: Different forms of reinsurance, their mathematical representation, history of reinsurance, and lines of business.
- Experience Pricing: Modelling of low frequency high severity losses based on historical data, and analytical tools to describe and understand these models
- Exposure Pricing: Loss modelling based on exposure or risk profile information, for both property and casualty risks
- Natural Catastrophe Modelling: History, relevance, structure, and analytical tools used to model natural catastrophes in an insurance context
- Solvency Regulation: Regulatory capital requirements in relation to risks, effects of reinsurance thereon, and differences between the Swiss Solvency Test and Solvency 2
- Insurance linked securities: Alternative risk transfer techniques such as catastrophe bonds
ContentThis course provides an introduction to reinsurance from an actuarial perspective. The objective is to understand the fundamentals of risk transfer through reinsurance and the mathematical approaches associated with low frequency high severity events such as natural or man-made catastrophes.
Topics covered include:
- Reinsurance Contracts and Markets: Different forms of reinsurance, their mathematical representation, history of reinsurance, and lines of business.
- Experience Pricing: Modelling of low frequency high severity losses based on historical data, and analytical tools to describe and understand these models
- Exposure Pricing: Loss modelling based on exposure or risk profile information, for both property and casualty risks
- Natural Catastrophe Modelling: History, relevance, structure, and analytical tools used to model natural catastrophes in an insurance context
- Solvency Regulation: Regulatory capital requirements in relation to risks, effects of reinsurance thereon, and differences between the Swiss Solvency Test and Solvency 2
- Insurance linked securities: Alternative risk transfer techniques such as catastrophe bonds
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in statistics, probability theory, and actuarial techniques
401-3927-00LMathematical Modelling in Life InsuranceW4 credits2VT. J. Peter
AbstractIn life insurance, it is essential to have adequate mortality tables, be it for reserving or pricing purposes. The course provides the tools necessary to create mortality tables from scratch. Additionally, we study various guarantees embedded in life insurance products and learn to price them with the help of stochastic models.
ObjectiveThe course's objective is to provide the students with the understanding and the tools to create mortality tables on their own.
Additionally, students should learn to price embedded options in life insurance. Aside of the mere application of specific models, they should develop an intuition for the various drivers of the value of these options.
ContentFollowing main topics are covered:

1. Guarantees and options embedded in life insurance products.
- Stochastic valuation of participating contracts
- Stochastic valuation of Unit Linked contracts
2. Mortality Tables:
- Determining raw mortality rates
- Smoothing techniques: Whittaker-Henderson, smoothing splines,...
- Trends in mortality rates
- Stochastic mortality model due to Lee and Carter
- Neural Network extension of the Lee-Carter model
- Integration of safety margins
Lecture notesLectures notes and slides will be provided
Prerequisites / NoticeThe exams ONLY take place during the official ETH examination period.

The course counts towards the diploma of "Aktuar SAV".

Good knowledge in probability theory and stochastic processes is assumed. Some knowledge in financial mathematics is useful.
Selection: Mathematical Physics, Theoretical Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0843-00LQuantum Field Theory I
Special Students UZH must book the module PHY551 directly at UZH.
W10 credits4V + 2UN. Beisert
AbstractThis course discusses the quantisation of fields in order to introduce a coherent formalism for the combination of quantum mechanics and special relativity.
Topics include:
- Relativistic quantum mechanics
- Quantisation of bosonic and fermionic fields
- Interactions in perturbation theory
- Scattering processes and decays
- Elementary processes in QED
- Radiative corrections
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the formalism, the techniques, and important physical applications of quantum field theory. Furthermore it prepares students for the advanced course in quantum field theory (Quantum Field Theory II), and for work on research projects in theoretical physics, particle physics, and condensed-matter physics.
402-0861-00LStatistical PhysicsW10 credits4V + 2UG. M. Graf
AbstractThe lecture focuses on classical and quantum statistical physics. Various techniques, cumulant expansion, path integrals, and specific systems are discussed: Fermions, photons/phonons, Bosons, magnetism, van der Waals gas. Phase transitions are studied in mean field theory (Weiss, Landau). Including fluctuations leads to critical phenomena, scaling, and the renormalization group.
ObjectiveThis lecture gives an introduction into the the basic concepts and applications of statistical physics for the general use in physics and, in particular, as a preparation for the theoretical solid state physics education.
ContentThermodynamics, three laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic potentials, phenomenology of phase transitions.
Classical statistical physics: micro-canonical-, canonical-, and grandcanonical ensembles, applications to simple systems.
Quantum statistical physics: single particle, ideal quantum gases, fermions and bosons, statistical interaction.
Techniques: variational approach, cumulant expansion, path integral formulation.
Degenerate fermions: Fermi gas, electrons in magnetic field.
Bosons: photons and phonons, Bose-Einstein condensation.
Magnetism: Ising-, XY-, Heisenberg models, Weiss mean-field theory.
Van der Waals gas-liquid transition.
Landau theory of phase transitions, first- and second order, tricritical.
Fluctuations: field theory approach, Gauss theory, self-consistent field, Ginzburg criterion.
Critical phenomena: scaling theory, universality.
Renormalization group: general theory and applications to spin models (real space RG), phi^4 theory (k-space RG), Kosterlitz-Thouless theory.
Lecture notesLecture notes available in English.
LiteratureNo specific book is used for the course. Relevant literature will be given in the course.
402-0830-00LGeneral Relativity Information
Special Students UZH must book the module PHY511 directly at UZH.
W10 credits4V + 2UP. Jetzer
AbstractManifold, Riemannian metric, connection, curvature; Special Relativity; Lorentzian metric; Equivalence principle; Tidal force and spacetime curvature; Energy-momentum tensor, field equations, Newtonian limit; Post-Newtonian approximation; Schwarzschild solution; Mercury's perihelion precession, light deflection.
ObjectiveBasic understanding of general relativity, its mathematical foundations, and some of the interesting phenomena it predicts.
LiteratureSuggested textbooks:

C. Misner, K, Thorne and J. Wheeler: Gravitation
S. Carroll - Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General
Relativity
R. Wald - General Relativity
S. Weinberg - Gravitation and Cosmology
N. Straumann - General Relativity with applications to Astrophysics
402-0897-00LIntroduction to String TheoryW6 credits2V + 1UB. Hoare
AbstractThis course is an introduction to string theory. The first half of the course covers the bosonic string and its quantization in flat space, concluding with the introduction of D-branes and T-duality. The second half will cover some advanced topics, which will be selected from those listed below.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to motivate the subject of string theory, exploring the important role it has played in the development of modern theoretical and mathematical physics. The goal of the first half of the course is to give a pedagogical introduction to the bosonic string in flat space. Building on this foundation, an overview of various more advanced topics will form the second half of the course.
ContentI. Introduction
II. The relativistic point particle
III. The classical closed string
IV. Quantizing the closed string
V. The open string and D-branes
VI. T-duality in flat space

Possible advanced topics include:
VII. Conformal field theory
VIII. The Polyakov path integral
IX. String interactions
X. Low energy effective actions
XI. Superstring theory
LiteratureLecture notes:

String Theory - D. Tong
http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/tong/string.html

Lectures on String Theory - G. Arutyunov
http://stringworld.ru/files/Arutyunov_G._Lectures_on_string_theory.pdf

Books:

Superstring Theory - M. Green, J. Schwarz and E. Witten (two volumes, CUP, 1988)
Volume 1: Introduction
Volume 2: Loop Amplitudes, Anomalies and Phenomenology

String Theory - J. Polchinski (two volumes, CUP, 1998)
Volume 1: An Introduction to the Bosonic String
Volume 2: Superstring Theory and Beyond
Errata: http://www.kitp.ucsb.edu/~joep/errata.html

Basic Concepts of String Theory - R. Blumenhagen, D. Lüst and S. Theisen (Springer-Verlag, 2013)
402-0878-00LField Theory with Symmetries and the Batalin-Vilkovisky FormalismW4 credits2GM. Schiavina
AbstractThe course is an introduction to the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, which provides a rigorous toolkit to treat classical and quantum field theories with symmetries, generalising the BRST approach. The course will feature applications to gauge theories and general relativity, and possibly to theories with defects (boundaries and corners).
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose master and graduate physics students to modern techniques in theoretical and mathematical physics to handle gauge symmetries in classical and quantum field theory. We aim to provide a solid mathematical background for third-semester master and graduate students to adventure further in this research direction.
ContentThe course will start with a review of the BRST formalism expanding on its introduction in Quantum Field Theory II. It will provide a mathematical background on (Lie algebra) cohomology and the necessary requirements to describe the BV formalism, including an introduction to symplectic geometry on graded vector spaces. Applications of the BV formalism to different examples like gauge theories, general relativity and sigma models will be presented, and a discussion on quantisation of classical field theories in this setting, together with possible inclusion of defects, will be considered as concluding topics for the course.
Selection: Mathematical Optimization, Discrete Mathematics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-3055-64LAlgebraic Methods in Combinatorics Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. Sudakov
AbstractCombinatorics is a fundamental mathematical discipline as well as an essential component of many mathematical areas, and its study has experienced an impressive growth in recent years. This course provides a gentle introduction to Algebraic methods, illustrated by examples and focusing on basic ideas and connections to other areas.
ObjectiveThe students will get an overview of various algebraic methods for solving combinatorial problems. We expect them to understand the proof techniques and to use them autonomously on related problems.
ContentCombinatorics is a fundamental mathematical discipline as well as an essential component of many mathematical areas, and its study has experienced an impressive growth in recent years. While in the past many of the basic combinatorial results were obtained mainly by ingenuity and detailed reasoning, the modern theory has grown out of this early stage and often relies on deep, well-developed tools.

One of the main general techniques that played a crucial role in the development of Combinatorics was the application of algebraic methods. The most fruitful such tool is the dimension argument. Roughly speaking, the method can be described as follows. In order to bound the cardinality of of a discrete structure A one maps its elements to vectors in a linear space, and shows that the set A is mapped to linearly independent vectors. It then follows that the cardinality of A is bounded by the dimension of the corresponding linear space. This simple idea is surprisingly powerful and has many famous applications.

This course provides a gentle introduction to Algebraic methods, illustrated by examples and focusing on basic ideas and connections to other areas. The topics covered in the class will include (but are not limited to):

Basic dimension arguments, Spaces of polynomials and tensor product methods, Eigenvalues of graphs and their application, the Combinatorial Nullstellensatz and the Chevalley-Warning theorem. Applications such as: Solution of Kakeya problem in finite fields, counterexample to Borsuk's conjecture, chromatic number of the unit distance graph of Euclidean space, explicit constructions of Ramsey graphs and many others.

The course website can be found at
https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=11617
Lecture notesLectures will be on the blackboard only, but there will be a set of typeset lecture notes which follow the class closely.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are expected to have a mathematical background and should be able to write rigorous proofs.
Auswahl: Theoretical Computer Science, Discrete Mathematics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
263-4500-00LAdvanced Algorithms Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AM. Ghaffari, A. Krause
AbstractThis is an advanced course on the design and analysis of algorithms, covering a range of topics and techniques not studied in typical introductory courses on algorithms.
ObjectiveThis course is intended to familiarize students with (some of) the main tools and techniques developed over the last 15-20 years in algorithm design, which are by now among the key ingredients used in developing efficient algorithms.
ContentThe lectures will cover a range of topics, including the following: graph sparsifications while preserving cuts or distances, various approximation algorithms techniques and concepts, metric embeddings and probabilistic tree embeddings, online algorithms, multiplicative weight updates, streaming algorithms, sketching algorithms.
Lecture noteshttps://people.inf.ethz.ch/gmohsen/AA19/
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is designed for masters and doctoral students and it especially targets those interested in theoretical computer science, but it should also be accessible to last-year bachelor students.

Sufficient comfort with both (A) Algorithm Design & Analysis and (B) Probability & Concentrations. E.g., having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, though not required formally. If you are not sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consult the instructor.
252-1425-00LGeometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AB. Gärtner, M. Hoffmann, M. Wettstein
AbstractGeometric structures are useful in many areas, and there is a need to understand their structural properties, and to work with them algorithmically. The lecture addresses theoretical foundations concerning geometric structures. Central objects of interest are triangulations. We study combinatorial (Does a certain object exist?) and algorithmic questions (Can we find a certain object efficiently?)
ObjectiveThe goal is to make students familiar with fundamental concepts, techniques and results in combinatorial and computational geometry, so as to enable them to model, analyze, and solve theoretical and practical problems in the area and in various application domains.
In particular, we want to prepare students for conducting independent research, for instance, within the scope of a thesis project.
ContentPlanar and geometric graphs, embeddings and their representation (Whitney's Theorem, canonical orderings, DCEL), polygon triangulations and the art gallery theorem, convexity in R^d, planar convex hull algorithms (Jarvis Wrap, Graham Scan, Chan's Algorithm), point set triangulations, Delaunay triangulations (Lawson flips, lifting map, randomized incremental construction), Voronoi diagrams, the Crossing Lemma and incidence bounds, line arrangements (duality, Zone Theorem, ham-sandwich cuts), 3-SUM hardness, counting planar triangulations.
Lecture notesyes
LiteratureMark de Berg, Marc van Kreveld, Mark Overmars, Otfried Cheong, Computational Geometry: Algorithms and Applications, Springer, 3rd ed., 2008.
Satyan Devadoss, Joseph O'Rourke, Discrete and Computational Geometry, Princeton University Press, 2011.
Stefan Felsner, Geometric Graphs and Arrangements: Some Chapters from Combinatorial Geometry, Teubner, 2004.
Jiri Matousek, Lectures on Discrete Geometry, Springer, 2002.
Takao Nishizeki, Md. Saidur Rahman, Planar Graph Drawing, World Scientific, 2004.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: The course assumes basic knowledge of discrete mathematics and algorithms, as supplied in the first semesters of Bachelor Studies at ETH.
Outlook: In the following spring semester there is a seminar "Geometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms" that builds on this course. There are ample possibilities for Semester-, Bachelor- and Master Thesis projects in the area.
252-0417-00LRandomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Methods Information W8 credits3V + 2U + 2AA. Steger
AbstractLas Vegas & Monte Carlo algorithms; inequalities of Markov, Chebyshev, Chernoff; negative correlation; Markov chains: convergence, rapidly mixing; generating functions; Examples include: min cut, median, balls and bins, routing in hypercubes, 3SAT, card shuffling, random walks
ObjectiveAfter this course students will know fundamental techniques from probabilistic combinatorics for designing randomized algorithms and will be able to apply them to solve typical problems in these areas.
ContentRandomized Algorithms are algorithms that "flip coins" to take certain decisions. This concept extends the classical model of deterministic algorithms and has become very popular and useful within the last twenty years. In many cases, randomized algorithms are faster, simpler or just more elegant than deterministic ones. In the course, we will discuss basic principles and techniques and derive from them a number of randomized methods for problems in different areas.
Lecture notesYes.
Literature- Randomized Algorithms, Rajeev Motwani and Prabhakar Raghavan, Cambridge University Press (1995)
- Probability and Computing, Michael Mitzenmacher and Eli Upfal, Cambridge University Press (2005)
Selection: Further Realms
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0423-00LNeural Network TheoryW4 credits2V + 1UH. Bölcskei, E. Riegler
AbstractThe class focuses on fundamental mathematical aspects of neural networks with an emphasis on deep networks: Universal approximation theorems, capacity of separating surfaces, generalization, reproducing Kernel Hilbert spaces, support vector machines, fundamental limits of deep neural network learning, dimension measures, feature extraction with scattering networks
ObjectiveAfter attending this lecture, participating in the exercise sessions, and working on the homework problem sets, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the mathematical foundations of neural networks.
Content1. Universal approximation with single- and multi-layer networks

2. Geometry of decision surfaces

3. Separating capacity of nonlinear decision surfaces

4. Generalization

5. Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces, support vector machines

6. Deep neural network approximation theory: Fundamental limits on compressibility of signal classes, Kolmogorov epsilon-entropy of signal classes, covering numbers, fundamental limits of deep neural network learning

7. Learning of real-valued functions: Pseudo-dimension, fat-shattering dimension, Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension

8. Scattering networks
Lecture notesDetailed lecture notes will be provided as we go along.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is aimed at students with a strong mathematical background in general, and in linear algebra, analysis, and probability theory in particular.
401-3502-69LReading Course Restricted registration - show details
To start an individual reading course, contact an authorised supervisor
Link
and register your reading course in myStudies.
W2 credits4ASupervisors
AbstractFor this Reading Course proactive students make an individual agreement with a lecturer to acquire knowledge through independent literature study.
Objective
401-3503-69LReading Course Restricted registration - show details
To start an individual reading course, contact an authorised supervisor
Link
and register your reading course in myStudies.
W3 credits6ASupervisors
AbstractFor this Reading Course proactive students make an individual agreement with a lecturer to acquire knowledge through independent literature study.
Objective
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