Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as GESS Science in Perspective.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Suitable for all students.

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Science Research
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0771-00LEnvironmental and Integral Conciousness and Communication Information
Limited number of participants.

Please describe your expectations. Why do want to attend this special topic? Do you have any pre-information about the integral model? Do you have any practical experience in environmental communication?
W2 credits2GR. Locher
AbstractThe environmental Conciousness and the sustainability discussion were the leading themes of the last decades. Now the public awareness is changing. We discuss these changes, look how different the postmodern perspectives interprete the reality and we evaluate how to communicate in times of trouble.
ObjectiveYou learn how to handle tools and concepts in environmental communication. Examples of realized campaigns and projects show what works and what's of minor impact.
We discuss the evolution of consciousness and the integral model from the point of view of communication, psychology and neuro sciences.
Content- What is Consciousness?
- Individual and social evolution of consciousness
- Environmental Consciousness or "is climate change a chinese joke?"
- Examples of campaigns, events, print products, media relations.
- Integral sustainability and the integral model of Ken Wilber
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- Integral Vision; Ken Wilber
- Reinventing Organizations, Frédéric Laloux
- Embrace your life, Wilfried Nelles
851-0157-00LMind and BrainW3 credits2VM. Hagner
AbstractIn the last 2500 years, the mind-brain relationship has been articulated in various ways. In these lectures, I will explore the scientific and philosophical aspects of this relationship in the context of relevant cultural, historical and technological processes, with a focus on the modern neurosciences, but I will also discuss works of art and literature.
ObjectiveBy the end of this lecture, students should be familiar with essential positions in the scientific and philosophical treatment of questions relating the mind to the brain. It should also become clear that some of the most relevant problems in current neurosciences have a long history.
ContentAccording to a myth, the ancient Greek philosopher Democrit dissected animals, because he was in search of the seat of the soul. Current neuoscientists use neuroimaging techniques like functional magnetic-resonance-tomography in order to localize cognitive and emotional qualities in the brain. Between these two dates lies a history of 2500 years, in which the relationship between the mind and the brain has been defined in various ways. Starting with ancient and medieval theories, the lecture will have its focus on modern theories from the nineteenth century onward. I will discuss essential issues in the history of the neurosciences such as localization theories, the neuron doctrine, reflex theory, theories of emotions, neurocybernetics and the importance of visualizing the brain and its parts, but I will also include works of art and literature.
851-0101-24LNarrative Science - An Introduction Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 25.
W3 credits2S
AbstractThe seminar aims to provide an introduction to the fairly new research field of "narrative science" and explores the various roles that narratives take on within the research process.
ObjectiveStudents develop an understanding of the role of narratives in science and get to know the standard readings for the field "narrative science".
ContentIn the course of their activities, scientists often construct and rely upon narratives. For example: narratives involve ordering materials, an ordering that can be achieved in a variety of ways, be it visually, through diagrams, flowcharts, maps, and the like, or through prose. Or: narratives can also serve as a motivator to get scientists through the often boring and monotone parts of their work. In the seminar we learn what can be known by subjecting these uses of narratives, their authors, characters and events, to serious scrutiny in order to appreciate the logics and rationales by which scientists’ narratives work. The literature draws from fundamental theoretical readings as well as concrete case study papers.
851-0101-73LHomo Faber. The Engineer in the Course of Time Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35.
W3 credits2SK. Liggieri
AbstractThe engineer is a central figure of modernity. Its vision unites "recognition" and "design" and is therefore an important point of reference for science, art and culture. Nevertheless, breaks can be seen in this figure. It is here that the changes in techniques, different images of people and anthropologies as well as political utopias can be read and determined.
ObjectiveThe aim of the seminar is to examine different images of engineers systematically (under the concept of homo faber) and historically. The different contexts and discourses (economy, politics, art) will be considered. Which time produces which "engineer image"? How do different technical practices determine the image of the homo faber?
ContentThe engineer is a central figure of modernity. Its vision unites "recognition" and "design" and is therefore an important point of reference for science, art and culture. Nevertheless, breaks can be seen in this figure. It is here that the changes in techniques, different images of people and anthropologies as well as political utopias can be read and determined. Particularly in the 20th century, the "engineer" developed into a problematic role model for a certain "type of person", who should actively change not only technology, but also society.
851-0101-81LScience, Politics, Ideology: Mapping a Conflict Zone Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2SM. Wulz
AbstractAs an 'objective' search for knowledge, science seems to be in sharp contrast to ideology. Or can we also find ideological forms of science – thus scientific knowledge under ideological conditions? Is 'ideology', in this case, a form of knowledge? And what is its role with regard to other forms of scientific knowledge?
ObjectiveIn the course, we will look at case studies and theoretical accounts in order to examine the conflict zone between science and ideology. We will develop methods in order to understand in which way 'ideological knowledge' can be analyzed in relation to science.
ContentThe relation of science and ideology has a long and controversial history. And even today this relation seems to be at stake, for example, when critics denounce climate change as an "ideological construct". In the course, we will look at case studies and in this way explore the conflict zone between ideological and scientific forms of knowledge. Based on theoretical approaches we will, moreover, develop methods in order to analyze the characteristics of ideological knowledge in relation to science.
851-0101-82LScience and the New Right (Completion)W3 credits2SM. Wulz, N. Guettler, M. Stadler, J. Steuwer
AbstractIn working collectively toward a publication, the seminar deals with a significant topic in the history of science: Science and the New Right. Students will learn to integrate skills in research, writing and science communication. A continuation of FS 2019, the block course will give students the opportunity to finalize their contributions to the publication.
ObjectiveStudents will learn to integrate skills in research, writing and science communication.
ContentThe New Right is inescapable – both, politically and as a media phenomenon. It also tends to come across as broadly antiscientific (climate denial, “fake news”, conspiracy theories, etc). And yet, as we’ll explore in this seminar, historically speaking ‘real’ science did play a significant role in the rise of New Right.
The seminar “Science And The New Right (Completion) will function as a workshop for research and writing. This block course continues the group work begun in FS 2019 (Enrolment in the precursor seminar (FS 2019) is mandatory!). Besides regular group-meetings and feedback-sessions, the block course focuses on the final editorial steps and completion of the publication. As before, participants will be expected to work independently, engage with the topic, and bring with them an interest in writing and the design of scientific publications.
851-0101-83LFrom the Laboratoy to a Magazine - Becoming a Science Writer Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
W3 credits2SW. Eilenberger
AbstractLearning how to write journalistic articles related to the sciences and humanities. Becoming familiar with essential techniques and genres of science writing and magazine journalism. Practicing the acquired skills by writing your own articles.
ObjectiveFirst steps into writing journalistic articles. Understanding the specific challenges and possibilities of science science. Understanding the importance of science writing for both society and the sciences.
ContentContent: Exercises for writing articles. Getting familiar with the conditions, possibilities and functions of science writing from the perspectives of cultural history, sociology and media studies. Scientific articles and conferences will serve as a base for the exercises. Participants will also learn how to offer and sell their articles to concrete magazines.
851-0101-76LThe Animals We Know Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W2 credits1ST. Novick
AbstractThis course explores the role of animal lives and bodies in the historical attempts to understand nature and the world. We will review examples such as the laboratory, the natural history museum, and the archeological site. Focusing on Israel/Palestine and the broader Middle East, we will consider animals as tools, objects of learning, and resources in scientific work and technological projects.
ObjectiveBy examining the place of animals in different cosmologies, in the construction of technological systems and environments, as well as their role in defining the contours of human, we will try to answer the question: What is the relation between animals and knowledge?
ContentThis course explores the role of animal lives and bodies in the historical attempts to understand nature and the world. We will review examples such as the laboratory, the natural history museum, and the archeological site. Focusing on Israel/Palestine and the broader Middle East, we will consider animals as tools, objects of learning, and resources in scientific work and technological projects.
851-0101-66LThe History of the BookW3 credits2SM. Hagner
AbstractBook print belongs to the most successful inventions in the history of mankind - it was especially important for the advancement of the sciences. Since 50 years, however, there is an ongoing talk about the end of book culture, and yet, in the 21st century the book proves to be remarkably robust. What is the reason for that?
ObjectiveIn this seminar, we will discuss selected episodes of the history of the book from Gutenberg to the present and analyse their relevance for our culture.
ContentBook print belongs to the most successful inventions in the history of mankind - it was especially important for the advancement of the sciences. Since 50 years, however, there is an ongoing talk about the end of book culture. In this seminar, we will discuss selected episodes of the history of the book from Gutenberg to the present and analyse their relevance for our culture.
851-0101-77LScience and the State Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2SR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will reflect on historical and contemporary relations between science and the state. Through various case studies, we will inquire how these two institutions shaped each other. The case studies will cover various scientific disciplines.
ObjectiveTo understand how science helped form the state apparatus, and how politics helped shape science; evaluate the image of science as three thinking vs. servant of the state; analyze the role of science in generating political authority and political reasoning; analyze how political ideals are expressed in science.
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