From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Integrated Building Systems Master Information
Main Courses
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
066-0418-00LWhole Building Simulation Information Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
Priority will be given to MBS students.
W3 credits3GK. Orehounig, J. Allan
AbstractThis course discusses the application of whole building simulation in the design, operation, and retrofitting process of buildings.
Objective- Understand energy and mass conservation principles in the analysis of energy performance of buildings;
- Use of building simulation in design, operation, and retrofitting process of buildings;
- Integrating HVAC, renewable energy, storage technologies and district energy systems
- Annual simulations, systems sizing, heating and cooling calculations, summer comfort calculations
- Obtaining and interpreting simulation results, parametric studies
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly a restricted number of places is available for this course. Priority will be given to MBS students. Please send an email to the lecturer after signing up in mystudies (if you are not a MBS student).
101-0588-01LRe-/Source the Built Environment Information W3 credits2SG. Habert
AbstractThe course focuses on material choice and energy strategies to limit the environmental impact of construction sector. During the course, specific topics will be presented (construction technologies, environmental policies, social consequences of material use, etc.). The course aims to present sustainable options to tackle the global challenge we are facing and show that "it is not too late".
ObjectiveAfter the lecture series, the students are aware of the main challenges for the production and use of building materials.

They know the different technologies/propositions available, and environmental consequence of a choice.

They understand in which conditions/context one resource/technology will be more appropriate than another
ContentA general presentation of the global context allows to identify the objectives that as engineer, material scientist or architect needs to achieve to create a sustainable built environment.

The course is then conducted as a serie of guest lectures focusing on one specific aspect to tackle this global challenge and show that "it is not too late".

The lecture series is divided as follows:
- General presentation
- Notion of resource depletion, resilience, criticality, decoupling, etc.
- Guest lectures covering different resources and proposing different option to build or maintain a sustainable built environment.
Lecture notesFor each lecture slides will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture series will be conducted in English and is aimed at students of master's programs, particularly the departments ARCH, BAUG, ITET, MAVT, MTEC and USYS.

No lecture will be given during Seminar week.
227-0680-00LBuilding Control and Automation Information W3 credits2V + 2UF. Bünning, J. Warrington, A. Bollinger, C. Gähler, R. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic concepts from automatic control theory and their application to the control and automation of buildings.
ObjectiveIntroduce students to fundamental concepts from control theory: State space models, feedback. Demonstrate the application of these concepts to building control for energy efficiency and other objectives.
ContentIntroduction to modeling
State space models and differential equations
Laplace transforms and basic feedback control
Discrete time systems
Model predictive control for building climate regulation
Regulating building energy consumption and energy hub concepts
Building automation
Prerequisites / NoticeExposure to ordinary differential equations and Laplace trasforms.
066-0420-00LIndoor Environment, Resources and Safety Information W3 credits3GA. Frangi, S. M. Schoenwald, K. M. Udert
AbstractPrinciples of Building Acoustics, Water and Fire safety
ObjectiveBuilding Acoustics
- Fundamentals of sound: Sound waves, Sound sources and free field sound propagation, Sound descriptors and sound levels
- Sound fields in rooms: Reflection and absorption at boundaries, Diffuse sound fields (reverberation time), Room modes
- Airborne sound transmission through building elements I: Homogenous structures: Monolithic elements, Double leaf elements (walls, windows, ), Linings, toppings and additional layers
- Airborne sound transmission through building elements II: Assembled (lightweight) structures: Double leaf framed elements
- Impact sound transmission through building elements: Impact sources, Floor elements and floor toppings, Introduction structure-borne sound and vibration
- Sound transmission in buildings I: Composite elements, Flanking sound transmission I: Concept of flanking, Monolithic buildings
- Sound transmission in buildings II: Flanking sound transmission II: Lightweight framed buildings, Outline prediction methods, Noise from building systems and installations
- Measurement, Descriptors and Regulations: Standardized measurement techniques and protocols

Water
- water supply: water needs, possible resources, quality requirements for different applications and possible treatment processes
- water distribution: requirements for storage and piping
- wastewater: different type: urine, feces, blackwater, light and heavy greywater, rain water, treatment possibilities, hygienic and comfort requirements
- water cycles
- wastewater as a resource: polishing water, nutrients, energy
- integral solutions off the grid
- water as part of the urban environment and for recreational purposes in cities
- examples

Fire and Safety
- Fire safety objectives and regulations
- Fire safety concepts and measures
- Fire statistics
- Human behavior and escape
- Structural fire safety
- Technical fire safety
- Organizational fire safety
- Risk and probabilistic
- Economy of fire safety measures
066-0422-00LBuilding Systems Information W3 credits3GA. Schlüter, L. Baldini, V. Dorer, I. Hischier, M. Sulzer
AbstractThe course gives an overview of concepts and design of building energy supply and ventilation systems, renewable technologies, thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and integrated systems both on building and on urban scale.
ObjectiveThe course has the following learning objectives:
- Knowledge of the fundamentals, principles and technologies for building heating and cooling, solar thermal systems, hybrid and mechanical ventilation, BIPV and Smart Energy Systems, Urban Energy Systems
- Knowledge of the integration and interdependencies of building systems and building structure, construction and aesthetics
- Ability to estimate relevant quantities and qualities for heating/ cooling of buildings and the related supply systems
- Ability to evaluate and choose an approach for sustainable heating/cooling, the system and its components
- Synthesis in own integrated design projects
Specialised Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Management 2: Evaluation ToolsW4 credits2GB. T. Adey, C. Richmond
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the tools that can be used to evaluate infrastructure. In particular tools:
- to measure the service being obtained from infrastructure,
- to predict slow changes in infrastructure over time, and
- to predict fast changes in infrastructure over time.
Objectiveto equip students with tools to be used to evaluate infrastructure and the service being provided from infrastructure
ContentIntroduction
Service
Reliability of infrastructure
Availability and maintainability of infrastructure
Mechanistic-empirical models
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Conclusion
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
102-0516-01LEnvironmental Impact AssessmentW3 credits2GS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractFocus of the course are the method, the process and content of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as well as the legal bases and methods for compiling an environmental impact study (EIS).
Using examples, a comprehensive view of the EIA is made possible by means of excursions.
In the frame of a project the process of am EIA will be workt out by the students.
Objective- Understanding the context of spatial planning and environmental protection
- Ability to use central planning instruments and procedures for assessing the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Ability to apply quantitative methods to assess the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Knowledge about the process and content of an EIA
- a capacity for critical review of environmental impact assessments
Content- Nominal and functional environmental protection in Switzerland
- Instruments of environmental protection
- Need for coordination between environmental protection and spatial planning
- Environmental Protection and environmental impact assessment
- Legal basis of the EIA
- Procedure of EIA
- Content of the EIA
- Content and structure of the EIS
- Application of the impact analysis
- Monitoring and Controlling
- View regarding the strategic environmental assessment (SEA)
- Excursions projects obligated under the EEA
Lecture notesNo script. The documents for the lecture can be found for download on the homepage of the Chair of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems.

Download: http://irl.ethz.ch/de/education/vorlesungen/bsc/environmental_impact.html
Literature- Bundesamt für Umwelt 2009: UVP-Handbuch. Richtlinie des Bundes
für die Umweltverträglichkeitsprüfung. Umwelt-Vollzug Nr. 0923,
Bern. 156 S.
- Leitfäden zur UVP (werden in der Vorlesung bekannt gegben)
Prerequisites / NoticeAdditional information on mode of examination:
No calculators allowed
103-0357-00LEnvironmental Planning Information W3 credits2GS.‑E. Rabe, M. Sudau
AbstractThe lecture covers tools, methods and procedures of
Landscape and Environmental Planning developed. By means of field trips their implementation will be illustrated.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the various instruments and possibilities for the practical implementation of environmental planning.
Knowledge of the complex interactions of the instruments.
Content- forest planning
- inventories
- Intervention and compensation
- ecological network
- agricultural policy
- landscape development concepts (LEK)
- parks
- swiss concept of landscape
- riverine zone
- natural hazards
- field trips
Lecture notes- lecture notes concerning the instruments
- Handouts
- Copies of selected literature

Download: http://irl.ethz.ch/de/education/vorlesungen/bsc/environmental_planning.html
Prerequisites / NoticeAdditional information on mode of examination:
No calculators allowed
151-0102-00LFluid Dynamics IW6 credits4V + 2UA. A. Kubik
AbstractAn introduction to the physical and mathematical foundations of fluid dynamics is given.
Topics include dimensional analysis, integral and differential conservation laws, inviscid and viscous flows, Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layers, turbulent pipe flow. Elementary solutions and examples are presented.
ObjectiveAn introduction to the physical and mathematical principles of fluid dynamics. Fundamental terminology/principles and their application to simple problems.
ContentPhenomena, applications, foundations
dimensional analysis and similitude; kinematic description; conservation laws (mass, momentum, energy), integral and differential formulation; inviscid flows: Euler equations, stream filament theory, Bernoulli equation; viscous flows: Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layers; turbulence
Lecture notesLecture notes (extended formulary) for the course are made available electronically.
LiteratureRecommended book: Fluid Mechanics, Kundu & Cohen & Dowling, 6th ed., Academic Press / Elsevier (2015).
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Physik, Analysis
151-0212-00LAdvanced CFD MethodsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny, D. W. Meyer-Massetti
AbstractFundamental and advanced numerical methods used in commercial and open-source CFD codes will be explained. The main focus is on numerical methods for conservation laws with discontinuities, which is relevant for trans- and hypersonic gas dynamics problems, but also CFD of incompressible flows, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and the Lattice Boltzmann method are explained.
ObjectiveKnowing what's behind a state-of-the-art CFD code is not only important for developers, but also for users in order to choose the right methods and to achieve meaningful and accurate numerical results. Acquiring this knowledge is the main goal of this course.

Established numerical methods to solve the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations are explained, whereas the focus lies on finite volume methods for compressible flow simulations. In that context, first the main theory and then numerical schemes related to hyperbolic conservation laws are explained, whereas not only examples from fluid mechanics, but also simpler, yet illustrative ones are considered (e.g. Burgers and traffic flow equations). In addition, two less commonly used yet powerful approaches, i.e., the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Lattice Boltzmann methods, are introduced.

For most exercises a C++ code will have to be modified and applied.
Content- Finite-difference vs. finite-element vs. finite-volume methods
- Basic approach to simulate incompressible flows
- Brief introduction to turbulence modeling
- Theory and numerical methods for compressible flow simulations
- Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)
- Lattice Boltzmann method
Lecture notesPart of the course is based on the referenced books. In addition, the participants receive a manuscript and the slides.
Literature"Computational Fluid Dynamics" by H. K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera.
"Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems" by R. J. Leveque.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in
- fluid dynamics
- numerical mathematics
- programming (programming language is not important, but C++ is of advantage)
151-0318-00LEcodesign - Environmental-Oriented Product DevelopmentW4 credits3GR. Züst
AbstractEcodesign has a great potential to improve the environmental performance of a product.
Main topics of the lecture: Motivation for Ecodesign; Methodical basics (defining environmental aspects; improvement strageies and measures); Ecodesign implementation (systematic guidance on integrating environmental considerations into product development) in a small project.
ObjectiveExperience shows that a significant part of the environmental impact of a business venture is caused by its own products in the pre and post-production areas. The goal of eco design is to reduce the total effect of a product on the environment in all phases of product life. The systematic derivation of promising improvement measures at the start of the product development process is a key skill that will be taught in the lectures.
The participants will discover the economic and ecological potential of ECODESIGN and acquire competence in determining goal-oriented and promising improvements and will be able to apply the knowledge acquired on practical examples.
ContentDie Vorlesung ist in drei Blöcke unterteilt. Hier sollen die jeweiligen Fragen beantwortet werden:
A) Motivation und Einstieg ins Thema: Welche Material- und Energieflüsse werden durch Produkte über alle Lebensphasen, d.h. von der Rohstoffgewinnung, Herstellung, Distribution, Nutzung und Entsorgungen verursacht? Welchen Einfluss hat die Produktentwicklung auf diese Auswirkungen?
B) Grundlagen zum ECODESIGN PILOT: Wie können systematisch – über alle Produktlebensphasen hinweg betrachtet – bereits zu Beginn der Produktentwicklung bedeutende Umweltauswirkungen erkannt werden? Wie können zielgerichtet diejenigen Ecodesign-Maßnahmen ermittelt werden, die das größte ökonomische und ökologische Verbesserungspotential beinhalten?
C) Anwendung des ECODESIGN PILOT: Welche Produktlebensphasen bewirken den größten Ressourcenverbrauch? Welche Verbesserungsmöglichkeiten bewirken einen möglichst großen ökonomischen und ökologischen Nutzen?
Im Rahmen der Vorlesung werden verschiedene Praktische Beispiel bearbeitet.
Lecture notesFür den Einstieg ins Thema ECODESIGN wurde verschiedene Lehrunterlagen entwickelt, die im Kurs zur Verfügung stehen und teilwesie auch ein "distance learning" ermöglichen:

Lehrbuch: Wimmer W., Züst R.: ECODESIGN PILOT, Produkt-Innovations-, Lern- und Optimierungs-Tool für umweltgerechte Produktgestaltung mit deutsch/englischer CD-ROM; Zürich, Verlag Industrielle Organisation, 2001. ISBN 3-85743-707-3

CD: im Lehrbuch inbegriffen (oder Teil "Anwenden" on-line via: www.ecodesign.at)
Internet: www.ecodesign.at vermittelt verschiedene weitere Zugänge zum Thema. Zudem werden CD's abgegeben, auf denen weitere Lehrmodule vorhanden sind.
LiteratureHinweise auf Literaturen werden on-line zur Verfügung gestellt.
Prerequisites / NoticeTestatbedingungen: Abgabe von zwei Übungen
227-0216-00LControl Systems II Information W6 credits4GR. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ObjectiveIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ContentThis course is designed as a direct continuation of the course "Regelsysteme" (Control Systems). The primary goal is to further familiarize students with various dynamic phenomena and their implications for the analysis and design of feedback controllers. Simplifying assumptions on the underlying plant that were made in the course "Regelsysteme" are relaxed, and advanced concepts and techniques that allow the treatment of typical industrial control problems are presented. Topics include control of systems with multiple inputs and outputs, control of uncertain systems (robustness issues), limits of achievable performance, and controller implementation issues.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are available to download.
LiteratureSkogestad, Postlethwaite: Multivariable Feedback Control - Analysis and Design. Second Edition. John Wiley, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Control Systems or equivalent
151-0660-00LModel Predictive Control Information W4 credits2V + 1UM. Zeilinger
AbstractModel predictive control is a flexible paradigm that defines the control law as an optimization problem, enabling the specification of time-domain objectives, high performance control of complex multivariable systems and the ability to explicitly enforce constraints on system behavior. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of MPC and covers advanced topics.
ObjectiveDesign and implement Model Predictive Controllers (MPC) for various system classes to provide high performance controllers with desired properties (stability, tracking, robustness,..) for constrained systems.
Content- Review of required optimal control theory
- Basics on optimization
- Receding-horizon control (MPC) for constrained linear systems
- Theoretical properties of MPC: Constraint satisfaction and stability
- Computation: Explicit and online MPC
- Practical issues: Tracking and offset-free control of constrained systems, soft constraints
- Robust MPC: Robust constraint satisfaction
- Nonlinear MPC: Theory and computation
- Hybrid MPC: Modeling hybrid systems and logic, mixed-integer optimization
- Simulation-based project providing practical experience with MPC
Lecture notesScript / lecture notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeOne semester course on automatic control, Matlab, linear algebra.
Courses on signals and systems and system modeling are recommended. Important concepts to start the course: State-space modeling, basic concepts of stability, linear quadratic regulation / unconstrained optimal control.

Expected student activities: Participation in lectures, exercises and course project; homework (~2hrs/week).
227-0478-00LAcoustics II Information W6 credits4GK. Heutschi
AbstractAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ObjectiveAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ContentElectrical, mechanical and acoustical analogies. Transducers, microphones and loudspeakers, acoustics of musical instruments, sound recording, sound reproduction, digital audio.
Lecture notesavailable
363-0514-00LEnergy Economics and Policy
It is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example,"Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
W3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractAn introduction to principles of energy economics and applications using energy policies: demand analysis, economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis, economics of fossil fuels, economics of electricity, economics of renewable energy, market and behavioral failures and energy policy, market-based and non-market based instruments and regulation of energy industries.
ObjectiveThe students will develop the understanding of economic principles and tools necessary to analyze energy issues and to formulate energy policy instruments. Emphasis will be put on empirical analysis of energy demand and supply, market failures, behavioral economics, energy policy instruments, investments in power plants and in energy efficiency technologies and the reform of the electric power sector.
ContentThe course provides an introduction to energy economics principles and policy applications. The core topics are
-Demand analysis
-Behavioral analysis of the energy sector
-Economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis
-Economics of fossil fuels
-Economics of electricity
-Economics of renewable energies
-Market failures and energy policy
-Market oriented and non-market oriented instruments
-Regulation of energy industries
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example, "Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
363-1000-00LFinancial EconomicsW3 credits2VA. Bommier
AbstractThis is a theoretical course on the economics of financial decision making, at the crossroads between Microeconomics and Finance. It discusses portfolio choice theory, risk sharing, market equilibrium and asset pricing.
ObjectiveThe objective is to make students familiar with the economics of financial decision making and develop their intuition regarding the determination of asset prices, the notions of optimal risk sharing. However this is not a practical formation for traders. Moreover, the lecture doesn't cover topics such as market irrationality or systemic risk.
ContentThe following topics will be discussed:
Introduction to finance and investment planning; Option valuation; Arbitrage; Choice under uncertainty; Portfolio Choice; Risk sharing and insurance; Market equilibrium under symmetric information.
LiteratureSuggesting readings:

1) "Investments", by Z. Bodie, A. Kane and A. Marcus, for the
introductory part of the course (see chapters 20 and 21 in
particular).
2) "Finance and the Economics of Uncertainty" by G. Demange and G. Laroque, Blackwell, 2006.
3) "The Economics of Risk and Time", by C. Gollier, and

Other readings:
- "Intermediate Financial Theory" by J.-P. Danthine and J.B. Donaldson.
- Ingersoll, J., E., Theory of Financial Decision Making, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers.
- Leroy S and J. Werner, Principles of Financial Economics, Cambridge University Press, 2001
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic mathematical skills needed (calculus, linear algebra, convex analysis). Students must be able to solve simple optimization problems (e.g. Lagrangian methods). Some knowledge in microeconomics would help but is not compulsory. The bases will be covered in class.
402-0812-00LComputational Statistical Physics Information W8 credits2V + 2UL. Böttcher
AbstractComputer simulation methods in statistical physics. Classical Monte-Carlo-simulations: finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Application to Boltzmann machines. Simulation of non-equilibrium systems.

Molecular dynamics simulations: long range interactions, Ewald summation, discrete elements, parallelization.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give a deeper insight into computer simulation methods in statistical physics. Thus, it is an ideal continuation of the lecture
"Introduction to Computational Physics" of the autumn semester. In the first part students learn to apply the following methods: Classical Monte Carlo-simulations, finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Moreover, students learn about the application of statistical physics methods to Boltzmann machines and how to simulate non-equilibrium systems.

In the second part, students apply molecular dynamics simulation methods. This part includes long range interactions, Ewald summation and discrete elements.
ContentComputer simulation methods in statistical physics. Classical Monte-Carlo-simulations: finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Application to Boltzmann machines. Simulation of non-equilibrium systems. Molecular dynamics simulations: long range interactions, Ewald summation, discrete elements, parallelization.
Lecture notesLecture notes and slides are available online and will be distributed if desired.
LiteratureLiterature recommendations and references are included in the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome basic knowledge about statistical physics, classical mechanics and computational methods is recommended.
529-0191-01LRenewable Energy Technologies II, Energy Storage and Conversion
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GT. Schmidt, L. Gubler
AbstractGlobal & Swiss energy system. Storage: Pumped water, flywheels, compressed air. Hydrogen as energy carrier; electrolysis; power-to-gas. Fuel cells: from fundamentals to systems; Fuel cell vehicles; electrochemical storage in batteries. supercapacitors and redox flow cells; electromobility. The main focus of the lecture will be on electrochemical energy conversion and storage.
ObjectiveStudents will recognize the importance of energy storage in an industrial energy system, specifically in the context of a future system based on renewable sources. The efficient generation of electricity from hydrogen in fuel cells, and the efficient energy storage in batteries and supercapacitors will be introduced. Students will get a detailed insight into electrochemical energy conversion and storage, which will play an important role in future energy systems.
Literature- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- K. Krischer, K. Schönleber: Physiccs of Energy Conversion, De Gruyter (2015)
- R. Schlögl, Chemical Energy Storage, De Gruyter (2013)
Prerequisites / NoticePlease note that this is a 3 hours/week lecture including exercises, i.e., exercises will be included and are not separated. It is therefore highly recommended to attend the full 3 hours every week.

Participating students are required to have basic knowlegde of chemistry and thermodynamics.
101-0178-01LUncertainty Quantification in Engineering Information W3 credits2GB. Sudret, S. Marelli
AbstractUncertainty quantification aims at studying the impact of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty onto computational models used in science and engineering. The course introduces the basic concepts of uncertainty quantification: probabilistic modelling of data (copula theory), uncertainty propagation techniques (Monte Carlo simulation, polynomial chaos expansions), and sensitivity analysis.
ObjectiveAfter this course students will be able to properly pose an uncertainty quantification problem, select the appropriate computational methods and interpret the results in meaningful statements for field scientists, engineers and decision makers. The course is suitable for any master/Ph.D. student in engineering or natural sciences, physics, mathematics, computer science with a basic knowledge in probability theory.
ContentThe course introduces uncertainty quantification through a set of practical case studies that come from civil, mechanical, nuclear and electrical engineering, from which a general framework is introduced. The course in then divided into three blocks: probabilistic modelling (introduction to copula theory), uncertainty propagation (Monte Carlo simulation and polynomial chaos expansions) and sensitivity analysis (correlation measures, Sobol' indices). Each block contains lectures and tutorials using Matlab and the in-house software UQLab (www.uqlab.com).
Lecture notesDetailed slides are provided for each lecture. A printed script gathering all the lecture slides may be bought at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic background in probability theory and statistics (bachelor level) is required. A summary of useful notions will be handed out at the beginning of the course.

A good knowledge of Matlab is required to participate in the tutorials and for the mini-project.
363-1038-00LSustainability Start-Up Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2GA.‑K. Zobel
AbstractExperts lead participants through a lean start-up process. The course contains idea generation and evaluation, team formation, and the development of one entrepreneurial idea per team. A special focus is put on sustainability, in particular on circular economy and renewable energy technologies.
Objective1. Participants become keen on starting their own company
2. Participants believe in their ability to found their own company
3. Participants experience the first steps within such a start-up
4. Participants reflect on sustainability issues
ContentThis course is aimed at people with a keen interest to address sustainability issues (with a focus on circular economy and renewable energy) with entrepreneurial ideas!

The seminar consists of a mix of lectures, workshops, individual working sessions, and team work. Reflecting on learning goals and progress is an integral part of the course.

All course content is based on the latest international entrepreneurship practices: The seminar starts with an introduction to entrepreneurship and sustainability, followed by idea generation and evaluation workshops, team formation sessions, the development of a business model around selected ideas, real-life testing of these business models, and a pitching training. The course ends with a pitching event where all teams will present their start-up idea.

More information can be found on http://www.sustec.ethz.ch/teaching/lectures/sustainability-start-up-seminar.html .
Lecture notesAll material will be made available to the participants.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
Interest in sustainability & entrepreneurship.

Notes:
1. It is not required that participants already have a business idea at the beginning of the course.
2. No legal entities (e.g. GmbH, Association, AG) need to be founded for this course.
3. Additonally to the weekly lectures, there will be the opportunity to participate at an optional presentation skills workshop.

Target participants:
PhD students, Msc students and MAS students from all departments. The number of participants is limited to max.30.

Waiting list:
After subscribing you will be added to the waiting list.
The lecturers will contact you a few weeks before the start of the seminar to confirm your interest and to ensure a good mixture of study backgrounds, only then you're accepted to the course.
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