Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2010)
3. Semester: Compulsory Courses
Examination Block 1
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0363-10LAnalysis III Information O3 credits2V + 1UA. Iozzi
AbstractIntroduction to partial differential equations. Differential equations which are important in applications are classified and solved. Elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic differential equations are treated. The following mathematical tools are introduced: Laplace transforms, Fourier series, separation of variables, methods of characteristics.
ObjectiveMathematical treatment of problems in science and engineering. To understand the properties of the different types of partial differential equations.
ContentLaplace Transforms:
- Laplace Transform, Inverse Laplace Transform, Linearity, s-Shifting
- Transforms of Derivatives and Integrals, ODEs
- Unit Step Function, t-Shifting
- Short Impulses, Dirac's Delta Function, Partial Fractions
- Convolution, Integral Equations
- Differentiation and Integration of Transforms

Fourier Series, Integrals and Transforms:
- Fourier Series
- Functions of Any Period p=2L
- Even and Odd Functions, Half-Range Expansions
- Forced Oscillations
- Approximation by Trigonometric Polynomials
- Fourier Integral
- Fourier Cosine and Sine Transform

Partial Differential Equations:
- Basic Concepts
- Modeling: Vibrating String, Wave Equation
- Solution by separation of variables; use of Fourier series
- D'Alembert Solution of Wave Equation, Characteristics
- Heat Equation: Solution by Fourier Series
- Heat Equation: Solutions by Fourier Integrals and Transforms
- Modeling Membrane: Two Dimensional Wave Equation
- Laplacian in Polar Coordinates: Circular Membrane, Fourier-Bessel Series
- Solution of PDEs by Laplace Transform
Lecture notesLecture notes by Prof. Dr. Alessandra Iozzi:
https://polybox.ethz.ch/index.php/s/D3K0TayQXvfpCAA
LiteratureE. Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, John Wiley & Sons, 10. Auflage, 2011

C. R. Wylie & L. Barrett, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, McGraw-Hill, 6th ed.

S.J. Farlow, Partial Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers, Dover Books on Mathematics, NY.

G. Felder, Partielle Differenzialgleichungen für Ingenieurinnen und Ingenieure, hypertextuelle Notizen zur Vorlesung Analysis III im WS 2002/2003.

Y. Pinchover, J. Rubinstein, An Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, Cambridge University Press, 2005

For reference/complement of the Analysis I/II courses:

Christian Blatter: Ingenieur-Analysis
https://people.math.ethz.ch/~blatter/dlp.html
151-0503-00LDynamicsO6 credits4V + 2UD. Kochmann
AbstractDynamics of particles, rigid bodies and deformable bodies: Motion of a single particle, motion of systems of particles, 2D and 3D motion of rigid bodies, vibrations, waves
ObjectiveThis course provides Bachelor students of mechanical and civil engineering with fundamental knowledge of the kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems. By studying the motion of a single particle, systems of particles, of rigid bodies and of deformable bodies, we introduce essential concepts such as kinematics, kinetics, work and energy, equations of motion, and forces and torques. Further topics include the stability of equilibria and vibrations as well as an introduction to the dynamics of deformable bodies and waves in elastic rods. Throughout the course, the basic principles and application-oriented examples presented in the lectures and weekly exercise sessions help students aquire a proficient background in engineering dynamics, learn and embrace problem-solving techniques for dynamical engineering problems, gain cross-disciplinary expertise (by linking concepts from, among others, mechanics, mathematics, and physics), and prepare students for advanced courses and work on engineering applications.
Content1. Motion of a single particle: kinematics (trajectory, velocity, acceleration), forces and torques, constraints, active and reaction forces, balance of linear and angular momentum, work-energy balance, conservative systems, equations of motion.
2. Motion of systems of particles: internal and external forces, balance of linear and angular momentum, work-energy balance, rigid systems of particles, particle collisions, mass accretion/loss.
3. Motion of rigid bodies in 2D and 3D: kinematics (angular velocity, velocity and acceleration transfer, instantaneous center and axis of rotation), balance of linear and angular momentum, work-energy balance, angular momentum transport, inertial vs. moving reference frames, apparent forces, Euler equations.
4. Vibrations: Lagrange equations, concepts of stability, single-DOF oscillations (natural frequency, free-, damped-, and forced response), multi-DOF oscillations (natural frequencies, eigenmodes, free-, damped-, and forced response).
5. Introduction to waves and vibrations in deformable elastic bodies: local form of linear momentum balance, waves and vibrations in slender elastic rods.
Lecture notesLecture notes (a scriptum) will be available on Moodle. Students are strongly encouraged to take their own notes during class.
LiteratureA complete set of lecture notes (a scriptum) is available on Moodle. Further reading materials are suggested but not required for this class.
Prerequisites / NoticeAll course materials (including lecture notes, exercise problems, etc.) are available on Moodle.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilitynot assessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingnot assessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsnot assessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management not assessed
151-0303-00LDimensioning IO3 credits3GD. Mohr, B. Berisha, E. Mazza
AbstractIntroduction to Dimensioning of components and machine parts. Basic structural theories are introduced and a short introduction to finite elements is given. Further, elements from fracture mechanics, plasticity and stability of structures are presented.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to build on and extend the theories from Mechanics 2. Students learn how to implement adequate models for practical dimensioning problems in mechanical engineering and how to solve and critically interpret these models.
Content- Basic problem of continuum mechanics
- Structural theories
- Introduction to finite element methods
- Strength of materials
- Fatigue
- Stability of structures
Lecture notesWill be announced during the first lecture.
LiteratureWill be announced during the first lecture.
151-0051-00LThermodynamics IO4 credits2V + 2UA. Bardow, C. Müller
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of technical thermodynamics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the fundamentals of technical thermodynamics.
Content1. Konzepte und Definitionen
2. Der erste Hauptsatz, der Begriff der Energie und Anwendungen für geschlossene Systeme
3. Eigenschaften reiner kompressibler Substanzen, quasistatische Zustandsänderungen
4. Elemente der kinetischen Gastheorie
5. Der erste Hauptsatz in offenen Systemen - Energieanalyse in einem Kontrollvolumen
6. Der zweite Hauptsatz - Der Begriff der Entropie
7. Nutzbarkeit der Energie - Exergie
8. Thermodynamische Beziehungen für einfache, kompressible Substanzen.
Lecture notesavailable
LiteratureM.J. Moran, H.N Shapiro, D.D. Boettner and M.B. Bailey, Principles of Engineering Thermodynamics, 8th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, 2015.

H.D. Baehr and S. Kabelac, Thermodynamik, 15. Auflage, Springer Verlag, 2012.

P. Stephan, K. Schaber, K. Stephan and F. Mayinger, Thermodynamik – Grundlagen und technische Anwendungen, 19th edition, Springer Verlag, 2013. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-642-30098-1

H. Herwig, C. Kautz and A. Moschallski, Technische Thermodynamik, 2nd edition, Springer Vieweg, 2016. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-658-11888-4
151-0591-00LControl Systems I Information
Note: The previous course title in German until HS21 "Regelungstechnik I".
O4 credits2V + 2UE. Frazzoli
AbstractAnalysis and controller synthesis for linear time invariant systems with one input and one output signal (SISO); transition matrix; stability; controllability; observability; Laplace transform; transfer functions; transient and steady state responses. PID control; dynamic compensators; Nyquist theorem.
ObjectiveIdentify the role and importance of control systems in everyday life. Obtain models of single-input single-output (SISO) linear time invariant (LTI) dynamical systems. Linearization of nonlinear models. Interpret stability, observability and controllability of linear systems. Describe and associate building blocks of linear systems in time and frequency domain with equations and graphical representations (Bode plot, Nyquist plot, root locus). Design feedback controllers to meet stability and performance requirements for SISO LTI systems. Explain differences between expected and actual control results. Notions of robustness and other nuisances such as discrete time implementation.
ContentModeling and linearization of dynamic systems with single input and output signals. State-space description. Analysis (stability, reachability, observability, etc.) of open-loop systems. Laplace transformation, systems analysis in the frequency domain. Transfer functions and analysis of the influence of its poles and zeros on the system's dynamic behavior. Frequency response. Analysis of closed-loop systems using the Nyquist criterion. Formulation of performance constraints. Specification of closed-loop system behavior. Synthesis of elementary closed-loop control systems (PID, lead/lag compensation, loop shaping). Discrete time state space representation and stability analysis.
Lecture notesLecture slides and additional material will be posted online.
LiteratureThere is no required textbook.

A nice introductory book on feedback control, available online for free, is :

Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers
Karl J. Astrom and Richard M. Murray

The book can be downloaded at https://fbswiki.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of (complex) analysis and linear algebra.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesnot assessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingnot assessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingnot assessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilitynot assessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingnot assessed
Critical Thinkingnot assessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsnot assessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management not assessed
Examination Block 2
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0033-10LPhysics I
Der Kurs wird zum letzten Mal im HS22 angeboten.
O6 credits4V + 2UL. Degiorgi
AbstractThis is a one-semester course introducing students into the foundations of Modern Physics. Topics include electricity and magnetism, light, oscillations and waves with Doppler effect. Selected topics with important applications in industry will also be considered.
ObjectiveThe lecture is intended to promote critical, scientific thinking. Key concepts of Physics will be acquired, with a focus on technically relevant applications. At the end of the semester, students will have a good overview over the topics of classical and modern Physics.
ContentElectric and magnetic fields, current, magnetism, Maxwell's equations, oscillations, waves.
Lecture notesNotes from lectures will be available (in German).
LiteratureHans J. Paus, Physik in Experimenten und Beispielen, Carl Hanser Verlag München Wien (textbook for the lecture), ca. 50 Euro.

alternative E-Book:
P.A. Tipler and G. Mosca, Physics for scientists and engineers, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesnot assessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingnot assessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
3. Semester: Engineering Tools
The Engineering Tools courses are for MAVT Bachelor’s degree students only.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0021-00LEngineering Tool: Introduction to MATLAB Restricted registration - show details
The Engineering Tools courses are for MAVT Bachelor’s degree students only.
W+0.4 credits1KB. Berisha
AbstractIntroduction to MATLAB; vectors and matrices; graphics in MATLAB; calculus, differential equations; programming with MATLAB; data analysis and statistics; interpolation and polynomials. Excercises with solutions: using MATLAB commands, technical applications.
ObjectiveIntroduction to numerical calculations with MATLAB.
ContentIntroduction to MATLAB; vectors and matrices; graphics in MATLAB; calculus, differential equations; programming with MATLAB; data analysis and statistics; interpolation and polynomials. Excercises with solutions: using MATLAB commands, technical applications.
Lecture notesCourse material:
https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=15113
Prerequisites / NoticeDer Kurs findet in einem Hörsaal statt und es stehen keine Rechner zur Verfügung. Es wird empfohlen, dass pro zwei Studierenden mindestens ein Laptop mit installiertem Matlab mitgebracht wird.

Installation Matlab:

- es funktionieren alle Versionen
- netzunabhängige Node-Lizenz (z.B. zum Download im ETH IT Shop)
- folgende Toolboxes/Features müssen installiert sein: Simulink (wird für RT1 benutzt), Curve Fitting Toolbox, Optimization Toolbox, Symbolic Toolbox, Global Optimization Toolbox
252-0863-00LEngineering Tool: Advanced Programming with C++ Information Restricted registration - show details
All Engineering Tool courses are for MAVT-Bachelor students only.
W+0.4 credits1KF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractThe programming model of C++ is discussed in some depth. In particular the mechanisms for efficient memory management and generic programming with C++ are covered.
ObjectiveAbility to implement memory-efficient data structures and efficient generic algorithms using C++.
ContentVectors, pointers and iterators, range for, keyword auto, a class for vectors, subscript-operator, move-construction and iteration. RAII (Resouce Allocation is Initialization) Principle, Templates and Generic Programming, Functors and Lambda Expressions.
Lecture notesDetailled, bilingual slides of the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureB.Stroustrup, The C++ Programming Language (4th Edition), Addison Wesley 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture Series Informatik I 252-0832-00L or equivalent knowledge in programming with C++.

Course can only be taken if the programming project is executed and submitted. If no solution to the programming project is submitted, the course is considered failed («no show»).
5. Semester: Compulsory Courses Examination Block 3
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0261-00LThermodynamics IIIO3 credits2V + 1UR. S. Abhari, A. Steinfeld
AbstractTechnical applications of engineering thermodynamics. Extension of thermodynamical fundamentals taught in Thermodynamics I and II.
ObjectiveUnderstand and apply thermodynamic principles and processes for use in a range of cycles used commonly in practice.
ContentRadiation Heat Transfer, Heat Exchangers, Ideal Gas Mixtures & Psychrometry, Steam Processes, Gas Power Processes, Internal Combustion Engines, Gas Turbine Processes, Refrigeration & Heat Pumps
151-0103-00LFluid Dynamics IIO3 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
ObjectiveExpand basic knowledge of fluid dynamics.
Concepts, phenomena and quantitative description of irrotational (potential), rotational, and one-dimensional compressible flows.
ContentTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, complex notation, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available (in German).
(See also info on literature below.)
LiteratureRelevant chapters (corresponding to lecture notes) from the textbook

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 5th ed., 2011 (includes a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 6th ed., 2015 (does NOT include a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis I/II, Knowledge of Fluid Dynamics I, thermodynamics of ideal gas
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0573-00LSystem Modeling Information W4 credits2V + 1UL. Guzzella
AbstractIntroduction to system modeling for control. Generic modeling approaches based on first principles, Lagrangian formalism, energy approaches and experimental data. Model parametrization and parameter estimation. Basic analysis of linear and nonlinear systems.
ObjectiveLearn how to mathematically describe a physical system or a process in the form of a model usable for analysis and control purposes.
ContentThis class introduces generic system-modeling approaches for control-oriented models based on first principles and experimental data. The class will span numerous examples related to mechatronic, thermodynamic, chemistry, fluid dynamic, energy, and process engineering systems. Model scaling, linearization, order reduction, and balancing. Parameter estimation with least-squares methods. Various case studies: loud-speaker, turbines, water-propelled rocket, geostationary satellites, etc. The exercises address practical examples.
Lecture notesThe handouts in English will be available in digital form.
LiteratureA list of references is included in the handouts.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilitynot assessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingnot assessed
Critical Thinkingnot assessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsnot assessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management not assessed
151-0575-01LSignals and Systems Information W4 credits2V + 2UA. Carron
AbstractSignals arise in most engineering applications. They contain information about the behavior of physical systems. Systems respond to signals and produce other signals. In this course, we explore how signals can be represented and manipulated, and their effects on systems. We further explore how we can discover basic system properties by exciting a system with various types of signals.
ObjectiveMaster the basics of signals and systems. Apply this knowledge to problems in the homework assignments and programming exercise.
ContentDiscrete-time signals and systems. Fourier- and z-Transforms. Frequency domain characterization of signals and systems. System identification. Time series analysis. Filter design.
Lecture notesLecture notes available on course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeControl Systems I is helpful but not required.
151-0917-00LMass TransferW4 credits2V + 2US. E. Pratsinis, V. Mavrantzas, C.‑J. Shih
AbstractThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ObjectiveThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ContentFick's laws; application and significance of mass transfer; comparison of Fick's laws with Newton's and Fourier's laws; derivation of Fick's 2nd law; diffusion in dilute and concentrated solutions; rotating disk; dispersion; diffusion coefficients, viscosity and heat conduction (Pr and Sc numbers); Brownian motion; Stokes-Einstein equation; mass transfer coefficients (Nu and Sh numbers); mass transfer across interfaces; Analogies for mass-, heat-, and momentum transfer in turbulent flows; film-, penetration-, and surface renewal theories; simultaneous mass, heat and momentum transfer (boundary layers); homogeneous and heterogeneous reversible and irreversible reactions; diffusion-controlled reactions; mass transfer and first order heterogeneous reaction. Applications.
LiteratureCussler, E.L.: "Diffusion", 3nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 2009.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents attending this highly-demanding course are expected to allocate sufficient time within their weekly schedule to successfully conduct the exercises.
151-0973-00LIntroduction to Process EngineeringW4 credits2V + 2UF. Donat, C. Müller
AbstractOverview of process engineering; fundamentals of process engineering; processes and balances; overview of thermal separation processes and multiphase systems; overview of mechanical separation processes and granular systems; introduction into reaction engineering, reactors and residence times.
ObjectiveWe teach the fundamentals of process engineering using practical examples as well as concrete process engineering problems in the areas of process control and balancing, thermal separation processes, mechanical separation processes and reaction engineering.
ContentOverview of process engineering; fundamentals of process engineering; processes and balances; overview of thermal separation processes and multiphase systems; overview of mechanical separation processes and granular systems; introduction into reaction engineering, reactors and residence times.
In addition to teaching basic theoretical knowledge, the focus is on solving typical problems in various subdisciplines of process engineering.
Lecture notesA script is provided (German language).
LiteratureFurther literature will be announced during the course. For the successful completion of the course, the lecture notes, the slides of the lecture and the exercise materials are sufficient.
151-3207-00LLightweightW4 credits2V + 2UP. Ermanni, T. Tancogne-Dejean, M. Zogg
AbstractThe elective course Lightweight includes numerical methods for the analysis of the load carrying and failure behavior of lightweight structures, as well as construction methods and design principles for lightweight design.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to convey substantiated background for the understanding and the design and sizing of modern lightweight structures in mechanical engineering, vehicle and airplane design.
ContentLightweight design
Thin-walled beams and structures
Instability behavior of thin walled structures
Reinforced shell structures
Load introduction in lightweight structures
Joining technology
Sandwich design
Lecture notesScript, Handouts, Exercises
227-0076-00LElectrical Engineering IIW4 credits2V + 2UC. Studer
AbstractSinusoidal signals and systems in the time and frequency domain, principle of operation and design of basic analog and digital circuits as well as analog-digital conversion.
Objectivesee above
ContentBeschreibung von sinusförmigen Signalen und Systemen im Zeit- und Frequenzbereich, Funktion grundlegender analoger und digitaler Schaltungen sowie von Analog-Digital-Wandlern.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
351-0511-00LManagerial Economics
Not for MSc students belonging to D-MTEC!
W4 credits3VO.  Krebs, P. Egger, M. Köthenbürger
Abstract"Managerial Economics" provides an introduction to the theories and methods from Economics and Management Science to analyze economic decision-making in the context of markets. The course targets students with no prior knowledge in Economics and Management.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to provide an introduction to microeconomic thinking. Based on the fundamental principles of economic analysis (optimization and equilibrium), the focus lies on understanding key economic concepts relevant for understanding and analyzing economic behavior of firms and consumers in the context of markets. Market demand and supply are derived from the individual decision-making of economic agents and market outcomes under different assumptions about the market structure and market power (perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, game theory) are studied. This introductory course aims at providing essential knowledge from the fields of Economics and Management relevant for economic decision-making in the context of both the private and public sector.
LiteratureMicroeconomics by Robert Pindyck & Daniel Rubinfeld, 9th edition 2018, The Pearson series in economics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course targets both Bachelor and Master students. No prior knowledge in the areas of Economics and Management is required.
401-0435-00LComputational Methods for Engineering Applications Information W4 credits2V + 2US. Mishra
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to the numerical methods for the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations that play a central role in engineering applications. Both basic theoretical concepts and implementation techniques necessary to understand and master the methods will be addressed.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students should be able to:

- implement numerical methods for the solution of ODEs (= ordinary differential equations);
- identify features of a PDE (= partial differential equation) based model that are relevant for the selection and performance of a numerical algorithm;
- implement the finite difference, finite element and finite volume method for the solution of simple PDEs using C++;
- read engineering research papers on numerical methods for ODEs or PDEs.
ContentInitial value problems for ODE: review of basic theory for ODEs, Forward and Backward Euler methods, Taylor series methods, Runge-Kutta methods, basic stability and consistency analysis, numerical solution of stiff ODEs.

Two-point boundary value problems: Green's function representation of solutions, Maximum principle, finite difference schemes, stability analysis.

Elliptic equations: Laplace's equation in one and two space dimensions, finite element methods, implementation of finite elements, error analysis.

Parabolic equations: Heat equation, Fourier series representation, maximum principles, Finite difference schemes, Forward (backward) Euler, Crank-Nicolson method, stability analysis.

Hyperbolic equations: Linear advection equation, method of characteristics, upwind schemes and their stability.
Lecture notesScript will be provided.
LiteratureChapters of the following book provide supplementary reading and are not meant as course material:

- A. Tveito and R. Winther, Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. A Computational Approach, Springer, 2005.
Prerequisites / Notice(Suggested) Prerequisites:
Analysis I-III (for D-MAVT), Linear Algebra, Models, Algorithms and Data: Introduction to Computing, basic familiarity with programming in C++.
401-0603-00LStochastics (Probability and Statistics) Information Restricted registration - show details
This course unit is offered for the last time in the Autumn Semester 2022.
W4 credits2V + 1UP. Cheridito
AbstractThe following concepts are covered: probabilities, random variables, probability distributions, joint and conditional probabilities and distributions, law of large numbers, central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, statistical inference, parameter estimation, confidence intervals, statistical tests, two-sample tests, linear regression.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the basic principles of probability theory and statistics.
ContentIntroduction to probability theory and statistics.
Lecture noteshttps://stat.ethz.ch/~meier/teaching/skript-intro/skript.pdf
LiteratureLukas Meier: Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung und Statistik: Eine Einführung für Verständnis, Intuition und Überblick. Springer, 2020.
Focus Project
Focus Projects in Mechatronics and Robotics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0073-10LGyroWheeler Restricted registration - show details
This course is part of a one-year course. The 14 credit points will be issued at the end of FS2023 with new enrolling for the same Focus Project in FS2023.

For MAVT BSc and ITET BSc only.

Prerequisites for the focus projects:
a. Basis examination successfully passed
b. Block 1 and 2 successfully passed

For enrollment, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
W0 credits15AR. Siegwart
AbstractStudents develop and build a product from A-Z! They work in teams and independently, learn to structure problems, to identify solutions, system analysis and simulations, as well as presentation and documentation techniques. They build the product with access to a machine shop and state of the art engineering tools (Matlab, Simulink, etc).
ObjectiveThe various objectives of the Focus Project are:
- Synthesizing and deepening the theoretical knowledge from the basic courses of the 1. - 4. semester
- Team organization, work in teams, increase of interpersonal skills
- Independence, initiative, independent learning of new topic contents
- Problem structuring, solution identification in indistinct problem definitions, searches of information
- System description and simulation
- Presentation methods, writing of a document
- Ability to make decisions, implementation skills
- Workshop and industrial contacts
- Learning and recess of special knowledge
- Control of most modern engineering tools (Matlab, Simulink, CAD, CAE, PDM)
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