Massimo Filippini: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Massimo Filippini
FieldEnergy and Public Economics
Address
Energy and Public Economics
ETH Zürich, ZUE E 15
Zürichbergstrasse 18
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 06 49
Fax+41 44 632 10 50
E-mailmfilippini@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.eepe.ethz.ch/
DepartmentManagement, Technology, and Economics
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
363-0503-00LPrinciples of Microeconomics
GESS (Science in Perspective): This lecture is for MSc students only. BSc students register for 363-1109-00L Einführung in die Mikroökonomie.
3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractThe course introduces basic principles, problems and approaches of microeconomics. This provides the students with reflective and contextual knowledge on how societies use scarce resources to produce goods and services and ensure a (fair) distribution.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives of the course are:

(1) Students must be able to discuss basic principles, problems and approaches in microeconomics. (2) Students can analyse and explain simple economic principles in a market using supply and demand graphs. (3) Students can contrast different market structures and describe firm and consumer behaviour. (4) Students can identify market failures such as externalities related to market activities and illustrate how these affect the economy as a whole. (5) Students can also recognize behavioural failures within a market and discuss basic concepts related to behavioural economics. (6) Students can apply simple mathematical concepts on economic problems.
ContentThe resources on our planet are finite. The discipline of microeconomics therefore deals with the question of how society can use scarce resources to produce goods and services and ensure a (fair) distribution. In particular, microeconomics deals with the behaviour of consumers and firms in different market forms. Economic considerations and discussions are not part of classical engineering and science study programme. Thus, the goal of the lecture "Principles of Microeconomics" is to teach students how economic thinking and argumentation works. The course should help the students to look at the contents of their own studies from a different perspective and to be able to critically reflect on economic problems discussed in the society.

Topics covered by the course are:

- Supply and demand
- Consumer demand: neoclassical and behavioural perspective
- Cost of production: neoclassical and behavioural perspective
- Welfare economics, deadweight losses
- Governmental policies
- Market failures, common resources and public goods
- Public sector, tax system
- Market forms (competitive, monopolistic, monopolistic competitive, oligopolistic)
- International trade
Lecture notesLecture notes, exercises and reference material can be downloaded from Moodle.
LiteratureN. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2017), "Economics", 4th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.
The book can also be used for the course 'Principles of Macroeconomics' (Sturm)

For students taking only the course 'Principles of Microeconomics' there is a shorter version of the same book:
N. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2017), "Microeconomics", 4th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Complementary:
R. Pindyck and D. Rubinfeld (2018), "Microeconomics", 9th edition, Pearson Education.
Prerequisites / NoticeGESS (Science in Perspective): This lecture is for MSc students only. BSc students register for 363-1109-00L Einführung in die Mikroökonomie.
364-0513-00LEmpirical Methods in Energy and Environmental Economics Information 3 credits2VM. Filippini, W. Greene, S. Houde
AbstractThis course is designed for PhD & advanced Masters students who are interested in energy and environmental economics. The focus of the lectures/seminars is on methods of applied econometrics in these fields. The course is composed of lectures on specific topics and a seminar. In the seminar, students will have an opportunity to present own papers or to present and discuss empirical studies.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are twofold: first, students will learn about the application of econometric techniques in the fields of energy and environmental economics. Second, through the presentation of their papers or the presentation and discussion of the existing literature, students will also get a sense of how critical thinking can be used to assess empirical research in energy and environmental economics.
ContentDay 1: Thursday, January 9
09:00 – 10:30 Session 1: Multinomial choice, heterogeneity (instructor: Greene)
11:00 – 12:30 Session 2: Multinomial choice, heterogeneity (instructor: Greene)
13:30 – 15:00 Session 3: Latent class and Mixed logit (instructor: Greene)
15:30 – 16:30 Session 3: Latent class and Mixed logit (instructor: Greene)
Day 2: Friday, January 10
08:30 – 10:00 Session 1: Measurement of the energy efficiency (instructor: Filippini)
10:30 – 12:00 Session 2: Structural models (instructor: Houde)
13:00 – 14:30 Session 3: Student Presentations
15:00 – 16:30 Session 3: Student Presentations
Day 3: Saturday, January 11
08:30 – 09:30 Session 1: Seminar by Prof. Kenneth Gillingham (Yale University)
09:30 – 10:30 Session 1: Seminar by Prof. Beat Hintermann (Basel University)
10:30 – 11:30 Session 1: Seminar by Prof. Matt Kotchen (Yale University)
10:30 – 12:30 Session 2: Student Presentations
13:30 – 15:30 Session 3: Student Presentations
Lecture notesLecture notes will be made available to the students.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are expected to have attended courses in advanced microeconomics and in econometrics.